Saturday, January 26, 2013

Let's Escape Winter in a Faraway Land

I know people are probably getting tired of the ice and snow now. But there's nothing you can do about it, so why don't you look at pictures of beautiful places instead? Take a look at these fabulous pictures by David Clapp of the Hebrides, which are the islands off the west coast of Scotland.


David Clapp, Isle of Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, www.davidclapp.co.uk

David Clapp, Callanish Stone Circle in Callanais, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, www.davidclapp.co.uk

The Hebrides are a part of the British Isles particularly steeped in myth and legend. Before Christianity it was reputed to be the retreat of holy men and this holds water, considering Fingal's Cave (an incredible place I hope to visit someday) and all the standing stones that are to be found on the islands. Later, Colum Cille (Saint Columba) established a monastery on Iona, one of the Hebrides, and spread Christianity to the Picts. It's no wonder holy men liked it there. I think I could be perfectly happy to live in austerity in a place like this...



David Clapp, Luskentyre, Isle of Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, www.davidclapp.co.uk

The scenery is so stunning too. Ethereal and mysterious are adjectives that come to mind.


David Clapp, Elgol, Skye, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, www.davidclapp.co.uk


David Clapp, Mangurstadh, Isle of Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, www.davidclap.co.uk

So, is anybody coming with me?

6 comments:

  1. I'll come! :) But only to visit. What I can't bear about these landscapes in the long term is the lack of trees. I get very broody, and feel too... exposed, anyplace where there are either no hills or no trees. I love to look at grasslands and such but I couldn't live there. I need the green, green woods, though so many people half-fear them.

    But I've always wanted to visit the Hebrides. It's a good area to hear some of the last native speakers of Scottish Gaelic too, which may or may not live through many more generations- another endangered Celtic language.

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    1. I agree, I need trees too. But my earliest childhood was spent in the Valley in Texas so some of my earliest memories are of wide open fields and endless sky, which explains my fondess for them and feelings of nostalgia when I stand in a large field full of blowing grass.

      Irish Gaelic will probably live on for quite a while longer, but it's a pity there are so few speakers of Scottish Gaelic now.

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  2. Amazing landscapes! Thanks for sharing with us!
    Have a nice Sunday day!

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    1. You're welcome! I'm glad you liked them.

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  3. absolutely beautiful! Thanks for sharing! I went away..in my head movies!!
    :-)

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